For Your Society

Facebook waited 16 days to tell people their private posts were actually public

  • Respect (0%)
  • Funny (0%)
  • Disappointment (0%)
  • Anger (0%)
  • Stress (0%)
  • Whatever (0%)

On Thursday, Facebook revealed that a bug in a new feature it was testing had made public posts that 14 million of its users thought were private. The company reportedly knew about the problem on May 22, but they waited 16 days to disclose it.

Facebook will not say why it delayed the announcement for so long, but because of lax regulations in the U.S. the company is under no obligation to disclose the information in a timely manner. And despite Congress appearing to come down hard on CEO Mark Zuckerberg, during congressional hearings last month, proposed bills that would put stricter rules on the Silicon Valley giant appear to be going nowhere fast..

Back in April, in the wake of Zuckerberg’s 10-hour marathon sessions in front of the House and Senate, Democrat Sen. Amy Klobuchar and Republican Sen. John Kennedy, introduced a bill to protect the privacy of users’ online data. Among the rules it would put in place was a mandate that consumers be told about a privacy violation within 72 hours. But since then support for the bill has been almost non-existent, and there has yet to be a single hearing.

If such legislation were in place today, Facebook would have breached it by almost two weeks. However, there appears little appetite in Congress to impose regulations on Silicon Valley, and instead, companies like Facebook are allowed to self-regulate.

Read: Facebook shared data with a Chinese company the U.S. considers a security risk

On Thursday, Facebook revealed that a bug in a new feature it was testing had made public posts that 14 million of its users thought were private. The company reportedly knew about the problem on May 22, but they waited 16 days to disclose it.

Facebook will not say why it delayed the announcement for so long, but because of lax regulations in the U.S. the company is under no obligation to disclose the information in a timely manner. And despite Congress appearing to come down hard on CEO Mark Zuckerberg, during congressional hearings last month, proposed bills that would put stricter rules on the Silicon Valley giant appear to be going nowhere fast..

Back in April, in the wake of Zuckerberg’s 10-hour marathon sessions in front of the House and Senate, Democrat Sen. Amy Klobuchar and Republican Sen. John Kennedy, introduced a bill to protect the privacy of users’ online data.

READ MORE @

Facts are under attack! Support Real Journalism.


https://news.vice.com/en_us/article/vbqxgy/facebook-waited-16-days-to-tell-people-their-private-posts-were-actually-public

share this with your people

FY Society explores American society with original content and analysis, as well as through the lens of curated news and articles.

We are simply trying to tell a story. Our story, the story of America past and present–who we are and how we got here, and perhaps more importantly: where we are going. We have a whole lot more in store, however, so please consider helping us in that effort by visiting the FY Store, or with a donation via Patreon.

WE NEED YOUR SUPPORT:

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Close Menu