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Whiskey & Immigrants is our new podcast which introduces listeners to regular, everyday immigrants. We hear their stories, how and why they came to America, expectations vs reality and much more. We hope you’ll join us.

Subscribe now on iTunes

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The Complexity of Not Calling the Police While Black

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The news has lately been inundated with examples of white folks (and even some nonwhite folks) doing the ultimate whitefolkin’ of calling the police for no reason on black folks who were doing nothing but existing and living their everyday lives.

From Starbucks to walking in the park with our own children or trying to get home, if you’re black, you’re a threat to societal peace and harmony. For many, I guess, calling the police is an entitlement due to the tax dollars being spent to hold up (no pun intended) the department.

For others of us, though, it’s not that simple.

I honestly can’t remember ever calling the police on anybody. And it hasn’t always been because of the ever-increasing database of proof we have of police interactions going wrong.

For most of my life, it’s been rooted in my deep distrust for the police in general. Sure, I like individuals who happen to be police officers, but I’m totally cool on the institution itself.

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I had to call the police (for insurance purposes) when my car was stolen from in front of my own home and them motherfuckers still found a way to try to blame it on me. I don’t even need to tell you how I feel, just know that N.W.A said it best.

Despite not calling them, that doesn’t mean I haven’t thought about it. A lot. I live in a neighborhood that damn near begs for it sometimes. But I just can’t. I can’t … risk it. And I know I’m not the only person who feels that way.

But my neighbors have tested the entire fuck out of my patience at times. And especially now, with kids, it creates a situation where some taxpayer-funded interventions might help … but I just can’t.

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I bought my house in 2012 in Southeast Washington, D.C. My neighborhood is in the city’s poorest section of the city, Ward 8.

While it’s got its fair share of inner-city issues—a 15-year-old Ballou High School student was murdered Wednesday down the street from my house—it is also a very vibrant neighborhood.

People are always outside and kids are running around, ringing my damn doorbell and running away. You know, normal inner-city shit. On any given Saturday or Sunday morning during the summer,

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FOR YOUR SOCIETY

For Your Society is a media organization that brings you curated news from trusted and reputable sources. We encourage you to support these publications and their journalists by subscribing to their services. Our intent is to stand up for facts, and to present them in an appealing and condensed way that doesn’t waste your whole day. We bring you news that focuses on politics, American culture, foreign policy & the world, science and more.

We also produce podcasts focusing on facets of American society where we think we could use some improvement. Our new podcast Whiskey and Immigrants, in which we sit down with real immigrants to hear their stories, is now live – Subscribe on iTunes. Shortly after that we will debut a podcast unlike any other, called Unite or Die. We’re keeping the details of that one under wraps, but we think it will truly benefit society.

We try not to be too annoying with ads or pop-ups, so we mostly rely on your purchases from the FY Society Store and donations through Patreon to sustain our not-for-profit operations. Anything you can do would be greatly appreciated!

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