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Whiskey & Immigrants is our new podcast which introduces listeners to regular, everyday people who have immigrated to the U.S. from elsewhere.

We’ll learn about their country of origin, how and why they came to here, find out how their expectations of the U.S. square with the reality they’ve encountered, politics, food, history and and so much more.

Join us.

Episodes now available:

  • S01E01 – Mexico – Santiago Sanchez
  • S01E02 – Slovenia – Gregor Strakl

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Whiskey & Immigrants is our new podcast which introduces listeners to regular, everyday immigrants. We hear their stories, how and why they came to America, their expectations vs. reality and much more. We hope you’ll join us.

Subscribe now on iTunes

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What you need to know about TESS, NASA’s new planet-spotting satellite

NASA is gearing up to launch a satellite into space that’ll be better than any other at finding Earth-like planets.

TESS, short for Transiting Exoplanet Survey System, will travel aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, scheduled for launch Monday at 6:32 p.m. local time from Cape Canaveral, Florida. The satellite is designed to scour the night sky for planets outside of our solar system — exoplanets, as scientists call them — with a particular interest in those similar enough to Earth that they just might be able to sustain life too. NASA hopes to find around 20,000 exoplanets, 50 of which will be about the size of Earth.

TESS is set to replace the first planet-searching satellite, the Kepler space telescope, which NASA sent it into orbit in 2009 and has begun to run out of fuel.

“The point of Kepler was to carry out a census: What are the statistics of the exoplanet population?” Stephen Rinehart, the project scientist for TESS at NASA, told VICE News.

So while Kepler’s goal was to figure out whether planets were common — and, it turns out, they are — Tess has a more specific purpose. With TESS, “we can start talking about what individual planets are like rather than as parts of broad demographic groups, or as statistics,” Rinehart said.

NASA is gearing up to launch a satellite into space that’ll be better than any other at finding Earth-like planets.

TESS, short for Transiting Exoplanet Survey System, will travel aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, scheduled for launch Monday at 6:32 p.m. local time from Cape Canaveral, Florida. The satellite is designed to scour the night sky for planets outside of our solar system — exoplanets, as scientists call them — with a particular interest in those similar enough to Earth that they just might be able to sustain life too. NASA hopes to find around 20,000 exoplanets, 50 of which will be about the size of Earth.

TESS is set to replace the first planet-searching satellite, the Kepler space telescope, which NASA sent it into orbit in 2009 and has begun to run out of fuel.

“The point of Kepler was to carry out a census: What are the statistics of the exoplanet population?” Stephen Rinehart, the project scientist for TESS at NASA, told VICE News.

So while Kepler’s goal was to figure out whether planets were common —

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